In an eight-page letter last week to the Judiciary Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Justice Department informed Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va.,that it was closing its investigation of the IRS targeting scandal, claiming there is not sufficient evidence to “seek any criminal charges” against Lois Lerner or any other IRS officials.
However, there were some key omissions in the letter that will continue to raise questions over the credibility of the investigation and its conclusion.



In the Oct. 23 letter, Peter J. Kadzik, the assistant attorney general for Legislative Affairs, said that the Justice Department’s investigation, conducted jointly by the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and the Civil Rights Division’s Criminal Section, “uncovered substantial evidence of mismanagement, poor judgment, and institutional inertia.”
Indeed, the letter admits that the IRS “mishandled the processing of tax-exempt applications in a manner that disproportionately impacted applicants affiliated with the Tea Party and similar groups, leaving the appearance the IRS’s conduct was motivated by political, discriminatory, corrupt, or other inappropriate motive.”  However, according to Kadzik, “ineffective” or “poor management is not a crime.”